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dc.contributor.authorBruun, A.
dc.contributor.authorEnnis, D.
dc.contributor.authorWansbrough, H.
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, P.
dc.contributor.editorSteve Allsop and Nicole Lee
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T11:20:52Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T11:20:52Z
dc.date.created2015-03-03T20:14:25Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationBruun, A. and Ennis, D. and Wansbrough, H. and Green, R. and Mitchell, P. 2012. Treatment and care for young amphetamine-type stimulant users, in Allsop, S. and Lee, N. (ed), Perspectives on Amphetamine-Type Stimulants, pp. 277-293. Australia: IP Communications.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/10759
dc.description.abstract

In the early to mid-2000s, researchers, policy-makers, and service providers began to respond to a dramatic increase in the prevalence of crystal methamphetamine use in the community (McKetin & McLaren 2004). The Australian media touted such trends as indicative of an 'epidemic' termed the 'ice age' (Carney 2006); however, more recent data indicate that rates of use may have declined. For example, an annual survey of Australian regular ecstasy users in 2007 found that 71 % of the sample had used any type of methamphetamine in the previous six months, compared to 54% in 2009 (Black et al 2008; Sindicich & Burns 2010). Despite this drop, methamphetamine continues to be one of the most commonly used illicit drugs among young people in our community (Cassar et al 2009; Sindicich & Burns 2010). In this chapter we investigate how service providers and practitioners can best respond to the particular needs of those young people whose use of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS), particularly methamphetamine, has become dependent and problematic.

dc.publisherIP Communications
dc.titleTreatment and care for young amphetamine-type stimulant users
dc.typeBook Chapter
dcterms.source.startPage277
dcterms.source.endPage293
dcterms.source.titlePerspectives on Amphetamine-Type Stimulants
dcterms.source.isbn9780980864991
dcterms.source.placeAustralia
dcterms.source.chapter28
curtin.departmentNational Drug Research Institute (NDRI)
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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