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dc.contributor.authorHurst, Chris
dc.contributor.editorL. Gomez Chova, A. Lopez Martinez, I. Candel Torres
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T11:54:53Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T11:54:53Z
dc.date.created2013-03-20T20:00:43Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationHurst, Chris. 2012. Australian Indigenous Children: Numeracy and Other Issues, in Gomez Chova, L. and Lopez Martinez, A. and Torres, I. (ed), Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation, Nov 19-21 2012, pp. 2666-2675. Madrid, Spain: International Association of Technology, Education and Development (IATED).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/16274
dc.description.abstract

Numeracy standards of Australian Indigenous school children have been of concern for some time. Recently, the Make It Count project has attempted to address the problem with a focus on urban Indigenous children. This paper describes the experiences of one Western Australian school where notable success has been achieved. It also describes research conducted as part of the project. Initial needs analyses revealed low numeracy levels and it was quickly acknowledged that it would be difficult to address numeracy standards unless underlying issues were dealt with. The most critical issues related to student attendance rates, student engagement, professional knowledge of teachers and paraprofessionals, parent engagement and the meaningful contextualisation of mathematics. Strategies were put in place to deal with these issues and encouraging results were attained. Attendance rates of Indigenous children have improved considerably and this is largely attributed to the 'culturally aware' and empathetic approach of school administration and teachers. Professional knowledge of education assistants has increased as has parent engagement whilst the number of Indigenous children at the school has increased three fold in five years. Children have engaged enthusiastically with a role model program and with the contextualisation of mathematics. Most significantly, the great majority of Indigenous children at the school have at least maintained 'at benchmark' levels for numeracy on the national testing program or have improved to being 'above benchmark'.

dc.publisherInternational Association of Technology, Education and Development (IATED)
dc.relation.urihttp://library.iated.org/view/HURST2012AUS
dc.subjectIndigenous education
dc.subjectschool improvement
dc.subjectmathematics education
dc.subjectresearch
dc.subjectculture
dc.titleAustralian Indigenous Children: Numeracy and Other Issues
dc.typeConference Paper
dcterms.source.startPage2666
dcterms.source.endPage2675
dcterms.source.titleICERI 2012 Proceedings: 5th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
dcterms.source.seriesICERI 2012 Proceedings: 5th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
dcterms.source.isbn978-84-616-0763-1
dcterms.source.conference5th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
dcterms.source.conference-start-dateNov 19 2012
dcterms.source.conferencelocationMadrid, Spain
dcterms.source.placeMadrid, Spain
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curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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