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dc.contributor.authorTian, Hu-Yong
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Craig
dc.contributor.authorPaskevicius, Mark
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Drew
dc.contributor.editorMaria Letizia Terranova, Silvia Orlanducci and Marco Rossi
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T12:10:10Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T12:10:10Z
dc.date.created2013-03-20T08:52:24Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationTian, H.Y. and Buckley, C.E. and Paskevicius, M. and Sheppard, D.A. 2013. Hydrogen storage in carbon aerogels, in Terranova, M.L. and Rossi, M. and Orlanducci, S. (ed), Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption, pp. 131-160. Singapore: Pan Stanford.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/18829
dc.description.abstract

Hydrogen storage issues have been universally investigated in order to satisfy the goals for a hydrogen economy. Carbon aerogels are regarded as one of the most promising candidates for hydrogen storage at cryogenic temperature (77 K) because they have ultra fine cell/pore sizes, continuous porosity, and high surface areas. Discussed in this chapter is the synthesis and characterization of various carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels were prepared from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol with furfural followed by carbonization and activation. The effect of pH values on microstructures of carbon aerogels were studied using acetic acid and potassium hydrate catalysts. Furthermore, an efficient and simple synthesis method was employed to prepare cobalt doped carbon aerogels. The chemical reaction mechanism and optimum synthesis conditions were further investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and thermo analyses with a focus on the sol-gel process. The carbon aerogels were investigated with respect to their microstructures, using small angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K. Hydrogen storage properties were investigated at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature at pressures up to 6.5 MPa.1.1Hydrogen storage issues have been universally investigated in order to satisfy the goals for a hydrogen economy. Carbon aerogels are regarded as one of the most promising candidates for hydrogen storage at cryogenic temperature (77 K) because they have ultra fine cell/pore sizes, continuous porosity, and high surface areas. Discussed in this chapter is the synthesis and characterization of various carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels were prepared from the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol with furfural followed by carbonization and activation. The effect of pH values on microstructures of carbon aerogels were studied using acetic acid and potassium hydrate catalysts. Furthermore, an efficient and simple synthesis method was employed to prepare cobalt doped carbon aerogels. The chemical reaction mechanism and optimum synthesis conditions were further investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and thermo analyses with a focus on the sol-gel process. The carbon aerogels were investigated with respect to their microstructures, using small angle x-ray scattering and nitrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K. Hydrogen storage properties were investigated at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature at pressures up to 6.5 MPa.

dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.subjectcarbon aerogels
dc.subjectcarbon storage
dc.titleHydrogen storage in carbon aerogels
dc.typeBook Chapter
dcterms.source.startPage131
dcterms.source.endPage160
dcterms.source.titleCarbon Nanomaterials for Gas Adsorption
dcterms.source.isbn9814316431
dcterms.source.placeFlorida USA
dcterms.source.chapter9
curtin.department
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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