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dc.contributor.authorWatson, P.
dc.contributor.authorWardell-Johnson, Grant
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T12:45:44Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T12:45:44Z
dc.date.created2010-03-29T20:04:44Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.date.submitted2010-08-03
dc.identifier.citationWatson, P and Wardell-Johnson, Grant. 2004. Fire frequency and time-since-fire effects on the open-forest and woodland flora of Girraween National Park, south-east Queensland, Australia. Austral Ecology. 29 (2): pp. 225-236.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/24922
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1442-9993.2004.01346.x
dc.description.abstract

The effects of recent fire frequency and time-since-fire on plant community composition and species abundance in open-forest and woodland vegetation in Girraween National Park, south-east Queensland, Australia, were examined. Cover-abundance data were collected for shrub and vine species in at least 10 400-m(2) plots in each of four study areas. Study areas were within one community type and had burnt most recently either 4 or 9 years previously. Variations in fire frequency allowed us to compare areas that had burnt at least three times in the previous 25 years with less frequently burnt areas, and also woodlands that had experienced a 28-year interfire interval with more frequently burnt areas. Although species richness did not differ significantly with either time-since-fire or fire frequency, both these factors affected community composition, fire frequency being the more powerful. Moisture availability also influenced floristics. Of the 67 species found in five or more plots, six were significantly associated with time-since-fire, whereas 11 showed a significant difference between more and less frequently burnt plots in each of the two fire-frequency variables. Most species, however, did not vary in cover-abundance with the fire regime parameters examined. Even those species that showed a marked drop in cover-abundance when exposed to a particular fire regime generally maintained some presence in the community. Five species with the capacity to resprout after fire were considered potentially at risk of local extinction under regimes of frequent fire, whereas two species were relatively uncommon in long-unburnt areas. Variable fire regimes, which include interfire intervals of at least 15 years, could be necessary for the continuity of all species in the community.

dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia
dc.subjectREGENERATION
dc.subjectBANKSIA-SERRATA
dc.subjectmultidimensional scaling ordination
dc.subjectresprouter
dc.subjectshrub
dc.subjectHETEROGENEITY
dc.subjectSYDNEY REGION
dc.subjectPLANT-SPECIES COMPOSITION
dc.subjectcluster analysis
dc.subjectplant community
dc.subjectFLORISTIC COMPOSITION
dc.subjectspecies composition
dc.subjectISOPOGON-ANEMONIFOLIUS
dc.subjectconservation
dc.subjectINTENSITY
dc.subjectinterfire interval
dc.subjectSANDSTONE COMMUNITIES
dc.subjectCOASTAL HEATHLAND
dc.subjectgranite
dc.titleFire frequency and time-since-fire effects on the open-forest and woodland flora of Girraween National Park, south-east Queensland, Australia
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateSubmitted2010-03-30
dcterms.source.volume29
dcterms.source.number2
dcterms.source.startPage225
dcterms.source.endPage236
dcterms.source.issn14429985
dcterms.source.titleAustral Ecology
curtin.digitool.pid135064
curtin.pubStatusPublished
curtin.identifier.scriptidPUB-SE-DEB-TMC-53385
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available
curtin.facultyFaculty of Science and Engineering
curtin.facultySchool of Agriculture and Environment
curtin.facultyDepartment of Environmental Biology


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