Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSingh, Zora
dc.contributor.editorL P Arauz, J M Fonseca and E W Hewett
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T12:58:00Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T12:58:00Z
dc.date.created2012-02-14T20:00:38Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationSingh, Zora. 2011. Aroma volatiles emissions from mango fruit: a closer look at various pre- and postharvest regulatory factors, in L.P. Arauz and J.M. Fonseca and E.W. Hewett (ed), Proceedings of the International Conference on Postharvest and Quality Management of Horticultural Products of Interest for Tropical Regions, Jul 23 2009, pp. 267-273. Costa Rica: International Society of Horticultural Science.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/27254
dc.description.abstract

Flavour is comprised of aroma and taste. Volatile compounds are the major constituents of fruit aroma, which are important in defining fruit quality and influencing consumer preferences. This paper will present the information on fundamental and applied aspects of aroma volatile production in mango fruit. Aroma volatile compounds have been reported to be influenced by various factors including the mango species, cultivars, location, fruit maturity at harvest, ripening conditions, processing and storage. The aroma volatiles found in mangoes may be classified according to various groups including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, lactones, aromatics, alcohols, esters, ketones, organic acids and aliphatic hydrocarbons. For about a decade, my research group has been exploring the effects of various pre- and postharvest factors on aroma volatiles production in mango fruit. We have identified 61 aroma volatile compounds from the ‘Kensington Pride’ mango fruit pulp, using a head space solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) technique with gas chromatography (GC) and GC combined with mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS). Effects of rootstock, harvest maturity, ripening temperature, plant growth regulators, edible coatings, storage conditions and various postharvest disease control methods on aroma volatile production will also be discussed. Low temperatures during storage induced chilling injury and reduced the production of aroma volatile compounds during fruit ripening and in fully ripe fruits. Controlled atmosphere storage has also been shown to reduce aroma volatile production in ‘Kent’, ‘Kensington Pride’ (KP), and ‘R2E2’ mango.The aroma volatiles profiles of these commercial cultivars of mango may be a baseline for developing new quality standards in future as the ‘quality’ expands beyond the common parameters. The mango industry needs to consider and review its postharvest procedures affecting this flavour component to maintain and/or build the consumer confidence.

dc.publisherInternational Society of Horticultural Science
dc.titleAroma volatiles emissions from mango fruit: a closer look at various pre-and postharvest regulatory factors
dc.typeConference Paper
dcterms.source.startPage267
dcterms.source.endPage273
dcterms.source.titleProc. Intern. Conference on Postharvest Quality Management of Horticultural Products of Interest for Tropical Regions.
dcterms.source.seriesProc. Intern. Conference on Postharvest Quality Management of Horticultural Products of Interest for Tropical Regions.
dcterms.source.isbn978-90-66053-77-9
dcterms.source.conferenceInternational Conference on Postharvest and Quality Management of Horticultural Products of Interest for Tropical Regions
dcterms.source.conference-start-dateJul 23 2009
dcterms.source.conferencelocationCosta Rica
dcterms.source.placeBelgium
curtin.departmentDepartment of Agribusiness
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record