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dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T13:22:13Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T13:22:13Z
dc.date.created2015-10-07T04:04:44Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationDouglas, M. 2015. Their Evil Lies in the Grapevine Effect: Assessment of Damages in Defamation by Social Media. Media and Arts Law Review. 20 (4): pp. 367-379.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/30905
dc.description.abstract

The number of cases of defamation by social media is growing. This article examines the principles of assessment of damages as they apply to those cases. In particular, the article examines the concept of the ‘grapevine effect’: a metaphor used to explain the basis for recovery of general damages for defamation. The grapevine effect has been deployed to notable effect in recent cases of publication by social media. The article argues that the role of the ‘grapevine effect’ reflects the purposes of awards of damages for defamation in light of the unique characteristics of social media.

dc.publisherLexisNexis Butterworths
dc.relationhttp://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2811967
dc.titleTheir Evil Lies in the Grapevine Effect: Assessment of Damages in Defamation by Social Media
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.volume20
dcterms.source.startPage367
dcterms.source.endPage379
dcterms.source.issn13251570
dcterms.source.titleMedia and Arts Law Review
curtin.departmentCurtin Law School
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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