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dc.contributor.authorGuthrie, Rob
dc.contributor.authorFernandez, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T10:29:58Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T10:29:58Z
dc.date.created2009-12-11T06:07:10Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationGuthrie, Rob and Fernandez, Joseph. 2004. Law schools in the 21st century : Not just training legal practitioners. Alternative Law Journal. 29: pp. 276-279.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/3273
dc.description.abstract

In 2000 the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) report Managing Justice contained a review of legal education. The Commission observed that:The size and structure of the profession as it then existed [in the 1970s] promoted a greater degree of cohesion and solidarity. That position has changed very dramatically over the past three decades. The number of lawyers has grown rapidly … specialisation is now a feature of practice, there are very large national and international firms … the number of law schools has nearly quintupled, and the academy mainly comprised of full time academics has a much more attenuated relationship with the practising profession.1This article examines the change in the delivery of law degrees in the last three decades. We note how legal education has moved away from traditional methods of teaching with a heavy emphasis on substantive law, but includes the study and practice of a range of skills and practices designed to provide a broad legal education. We consider the apparent over-supply of law graduates. We conclude that changes to the legal profession in the last 20 years, which include a reduced availability of clerkships, require a re-thinking of the delivery of law degrees. We argue that the law degree of the 21st century should focus on a student centred approach which integrates increased skills components in order to enhance the employability of the graduates for the legal profession and a range of other professions.

dc.publisherLegal Service Bulletin Co-Operative Ltd
dc.titleLaw schools in the 21st century
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.volume29
dcterms.source.startPage276
dcterms.source.endPage279
dcterms.source.issn1037969X
dcterms.source.titleAlternative Law Journal
curtin.note

This article was first published in the Alternative Law Journal. A link to the journal's website can be found in the Related Links field.

curtin.departmentSchool of Business Law
curtin.accessStatusOpen access
curtin.facultyCurtin Business School
curtin.facultySchool of Business Law and Taxation


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