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dc.contributor.authorLewis, Simon
dc.contributor.authorLim, K.
dc.contributor.editorJay A Siegel & Pekka J Saukko
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T13:41:42Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T13:41:42Z
dc.date.created2013-07-29T20:00:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationLewis, S. W. and Lim, K. F. 2013. Spectroscopy: Basic Principles, in Siegel, J. A. and Saukko, P. J. (ed), Encyclopedia of Forensic Sciences 2nd ed, Vol. 3, pp. 635-640. Australia: Academic Press.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/34168
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-382165-2.00256-7
dc.description.abstract

Spectroscopy is the study of electromagnetic radiation and its production from, or its interaction with, matter. Historically, spectroscopy has played an essential role in the development of atomic theory, and it is still extensively used for fundamental studies. Spectroscopic techniques are widely used in forensic laboratories for quantitative and qualitative analysis. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of spectroscopy as applied to analytical measurements; for more in-depth details concerning specific matter–radiation interactions, instrumentation, and techniques, readers are directed to the reference works listed under Further Reading.

dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.titleSpectroscopy: Basic Principles
dc.typeBook Chapter
dcterms.source.startPage635
dcterms.source.endPage640
dcterms.source.titleEncyclopedia of Forensic Sciences
dcterms.source.isbn9780123821652
dcterms.source.placeAustralia
dcterms.source.chapter47
curtin.note

This article is a revision of the previous edition article by K P Kirkbride, volume 3, pp. 191–194, © 2000, Elsevier Ltd.

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curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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