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dc.contributor.authorGreen, M.
dc.contributor.authorSaggers, Sherry
dc.contributor.editorGermov, J. & Poole, M
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T13:45:54Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T13:45:54Z
dc.date.created2010-04-25T20:02:33Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.submitted2010-12-03
dc.identifier.citationGreen, Meredith and Saggers, Sherry. 2007. Race and Reconciliation in Australia, in Germov, J. & Poole, M (ed), Public sociology - An introduction to Australian sociology, pp. 281-300. Allen & Unwin: Sydney.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/34832
dc.description.abstract

Like the children and young people in the vignette above, Indigenous people throughout Australia are making lives for themselves while facing complex challenges, from practical considerations such as trying to stay alive longer and attain a decent standard of living, to questions about their identities and relationships with other Australians. Understanding the position of Indigenous people in contemporary Australia requires some knowledge of the past and the way in which the past continues to influence subsequent generations of people. Race and reconciliation are integral to this understanding. Theories of race, once fixed, have become more complex; invalid biological and ‘science’-based frameworks have been replaced by theories focusing on the multiple social meanings of race and race relations. These have implicitly framed the development of policies addressing Indigenous disadvantage, from the earliest attempts to ‘protect’ Indigenous people by forcing them into missions and reserves, to the current mainstreaming of services and challenges to communal land title. The notion of reconciliation—the bringing together of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians—encourages us to think about the practical and symbolic dimensions of the past and present and what is required to address persistent inequality.

dc.publisherSydney
dc.titleRace and Reconciliation in Australia
dc.typeBook Chapter
dcterms.dateSubmitted2010-04-26
dcterms.source.startPage281
dcterms.source.endPage300
dcterms.source.titlePublic sociology. An introduction to Australian sociology.
dcterms.source.isbn9781741750607
dcterms.source.placeAllen & Unwin
dcterms.source.chapter24
curtin.digitool.pid136539
curtin.pubStatusPublished
curtin.departmentNational Drug Research Institute (Research Institute)
curtin.identifier.scriptidPUB-HEA-NDR-VR-55800
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available
curtin.facultyNational Drug Research Institute
curtin.facultyFaculty of Health Sciences


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