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dc.contributor.authorFenna, Alan
dc.contributor.authorTapper, Alan
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T10:35:01Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T10:35:01Z
dc.date.created2015-10-14T02:46:42Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationFenna, A. and Tapper, A. 2015. Economic Inequality in Australia: a reassessment. Australian Journal of Political Science. 50 (3): pp. 393-411.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/3914
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10361146.2015.1066309
dc.description.abstract

This article reviews and analyses the evidence on the distribution of income and wealth in Australia since the 1960s. A number of scholars – most prominently among them Thomas Piketty – suggest that inequality has been increasing across the advanced capitalist world. Kuznets’ benign picture of an ‘inverted u-curve’ depicting declining inequality in modern industrial society is replaced with an altogether different and potentially quite alarming one. Does this hold for Australia? Surveying 25 income trend and 17 wealth distribution studies, we draw on the best available evidence and find that overall there has been far less of a rising inequality trend than is often assumed or argued.

dc.publisherTaylor and Francis
dc.subjectInequality
dc.subjectWealth
dc.subjectIncome Distribution
dc.titleEconomic Inequality in Australia: a reassessment
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.volume50
dcterms.source.number3
dcterms.source.startPage393
dcterms.source.endPage411
dcterms.source.issn1036-1146
dcterms.source.titleAustralian Journal of Political Science
curtin.departmentJohn Curtin Institute of Public Policy (JCIPP)
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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