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dc.contributor.authorKlem, B.
dc.contributor.authorWild, C.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, S.
dc.contributor.authorNg, Leo
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T15:17:43Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T15:17:43Z
dc.date.created2016-11-22T19:30:22Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.submitted2016-11-23
dc.identifier.citationKlem, B. and Wild, C. and Williams, S. and Ng, L. 2016. Effect of external ankle support on ankle and knee biomechanics during the cutting maneuver in basketball players. The American Journal of Sports Medicine.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/44998
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0363546516673988
dc.description.abstract

Background: Despite the high prevalence of lower extremity injuries in female basketball players as well as a high proportion of athletes who wear ankle braces, there is a paucity of research pertaining to the effects of ankle bracing on ankle and knee biomechanics during basketball-specific tasks. Purpose: To compare the effects of a lace-up brace (ASO), a hinged brace (Active T2), and no ankle bracing (control) on ankle and knee joint kinematics and joint reaction forces in female basketball athletes during a cutting maneuver. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty healthy, semi-elite female basketball players performed a cutting task under both ankle brace conditions (lace-up ankle brace and hinged ankle brace) and a no-brace condition. The 3-dimensional kinematics of the ankle and knee during the cutting maneuver were measured with an 18-camera motion analysis system (250 Hz), and ground-reaction force data were collected by use of a multichannel force plate (2000 Hz) to quantify ankle and knee joint reaction forces. Conditions were randomized using a block randomization method. Results: Compared with the control condition, the hinged ankle brace significantly restricted peak ankle inversion (mean difference, 1.7°; P = .023). No significant difference was found between the lace-up brace and the control condition (P = .865). Compared with the lace-up brace, the hinged brace significantly reduced ankle and knee joint compressive forces at the time of peak ankle dorsiflexion (mean difference, 1.5 N/kg [P = .018] and 1.4 N/kg [P = .013], respectively). Additionally, the hinged ankle brace significantly reduced knee anterior shear forces compared with the lace-up brace both during the deceleration phase and at peak ankle dorsiflexion (mean difference, 0.8 N/kg [P = .018] and 0.9 N/kg [P = .011], respectively). Conclusion: The hinged ankle brace significantly reduced ankle inversion compared with the no-brace condition and reduced ankle and knee joint forces compared with the lace-up brace in a female basketball population during a cutting task. Compared with the lace-up brace, the hinged brace may be a better choice of prophylactic ankle support for female basketball players from a biomechanical perspective. However, both braces increased knee internal rotation and knee abduction angles, which may be problematic for a population that already has a high prevalence of knee injuries.

dc.publisherSage Publications Inc
dc.titleEffect of external ankle support on ankle and knee biomechanics during the cutting maneuver in basketball players
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateSubmitted2016-11-23
dcterms.source.volume
dcterms.source.startPage1
dcterms.source.endPage7
dcterms.source.titleThe American Journal of Sports Medicine
curtin.digitool.pid246731
curtin.pubStatusIn Press
curtin.refereedTRUE
curtin.departmentSchool of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science
curtin.identifier.scriptidPUB-HEA-SOP-LN-15550
curtin.identifier.elementsidELEMENTS-140275
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available


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