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dc.contributor.authorBoyes, Mark
dc.contributor.authorTebbutt, B.
dc.contributor.authorPreece, K.
dc.contributor.authorBadcock, N.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T03:01:02Z
dc.date.available2017-06-23T03:01:02Z
dc.date.created2017-06-19T03:39:30Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.date.submitted2017-06-19
dc.identifier.citationBoyes, M. and Tebbutt, B. and Preece, K. and Badcock, N. 2017. Relationships between Reading Ability and Child Mental Health: Moderating Effects of Self-Esteem. Australian Psychologist. 53 (2): pp. 125-133.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/53720
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ap.12281
dc.description.abstract

Objective: Children with reading difficulties are at elevated risk for externalising (e.g., conduct disorder) and internalising (e.g., anxiety and depression) mental health problems. Reading ability is also negatively associated with self-esteem, a consistent predictor of child and adolescent mental health more broadly. This study examined whether self-esteem moderated and/or mediated relationships between reading ability and mental health. Method: One hundred and seventeen children (7-12 years) completed standardised reading assessments (Castles and Coltheart Test 2; CC2) and self-report measures of mental health (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; SDQ) and self-esteem (Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory). Non-verbal intelligence (IQ) was measured using the block design and matrix reasoning subscales of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, and was controlled for in all multivariate analyses. Results: Reading ability was negatively associated with internalising symptoms. This relationship was not moderated by self-esteem. Poor readers also reported more total difficulties and externalising symptoms, but only at low levels of self-esteem. There was no evidence that self-esteem mediated relationships between reading ability and mental health. Conclusions: Poor reading was associated with internalising symptoms. Self-esteem moderated the impact of reading ability on total difficulties and externalising symptoms, with high self-esteem buffering against negative impacts of poor reading. However, the reliability of the self-esteem scale used in the study was poor and findings need replication using a reliable and valid self-esteem measure, as well as other measures of child mental health. If replicated, future research should examine whether interventions aiming to improve self-esteem can reduce the risk of externalising problems in children with reading difficulties.

dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons
dc.titleRelationships between Reading Ability and Child Mental Health: Moderating Effects of Self-Esteem
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.dateSubmitted2017-06-19
dcterms.source.issn0005-0067
dcterms.source.titleAustralian Psychologist
curtin.digitool.pid252292
curtin.note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boyes, M. and Tebbutt, B. and Preece, K. and Badcock, N. 2017. Relationships between Reading Ability and Child Mental Health: Moderating Effects of Self-Esteem. Australian Psychologist, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/ap.12281. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving at http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html

curtin.pubStatusIn Press
curtin.refereedTRUE
curtin.departmentSchool of Psychology and Speech Pathology
curtin.identifier.scriptidPUB-HEA-SPS-MB-73027
curtin.identifier.elementsidELEMENTS-203886
curtin.accessStatusOpen access


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