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dc.contributor.authorChamhuri, Norshamliza
dc.contributor.supervisorProf. Peter J. Batt
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T09:50:48Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T09:50:48Z
dc.date.created2012-01-23T07:36:36Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/540
dc.description.abstract

Malaysia, like many other developing countries, is experiencing major change within its retail food industry. A number of pull factors including an increase in personal disposable income, greater urbanisation, changes in lifestyle and an increasing interest in food safety have contributed to the emergence of modern supermarkets and hypermarkets in Malaysia. Previous studies into the impact of modern food retailing suggest that many consumers will shift their food purchasing behaviour from the traditional retail outlets to modern retail formats which offer better quality products, lower prices, a more comfortable environment and the convenience of one-stop shopping.A shopping-mall intercept survey of more than 500 food shoppers in the Klang Valley revealed that despite the expansion of modern retail formats in Kuala Lumpur, most consumers still purchase the majority of their fresh/chilled meat and fresh fruit and vegetables from traditional retail outlets. Although modern retail outlets and traditional markets share many of the same variables which influence respondents’ choices of retail stores, the traditional markets for fresh/chilled meat are anticipated to remain strong as many consumers perceive that the food available from these markets is guaranteed Halal and safe to eat. Furthermore, consumers still appreciate the personalised service offered by trusted and knowledgeable vendors, which is seldom offered when purchasing fresh food from a modern retail outlet. Among the main drivers for consumers to purchase their fresh fruit and vegetables from a traditional market were the ability to bargain on price, the lower price offered and the wider range of fresh produce available.In the attempt to identify the relationship between the perceived quality cues and quality attributes in respondents’ decisions to purchase fresh food, the findings from this study reveal that a number of variables were utilised by respondents to evaluate a multiple number of desired values. The freshness of both fresh/chilled meat and fresh fruit and vegetables signifies that the food will have a good taste, a good texture/mouth feel, be healthy and nutritious and represent good value for money. Fresh/chilled meat that is free from growth promotants and fresh produce that is free from chemical residues indicates that the food is safe to eat, healthy and nutritious and has been produced in a manner that was not harmful for the environment or worker welfare. The findings of the study have practical implications for producers, food marketers and the government.

dc.languageen
dc.publisherCurtin University
dc.subjectquality cues
dc.subjectMalaysia
dc.subjectfresh food
dc.subjecthypermarkets
dc.subjectretail food industry
dc.subjectquality attributes
dc.subjectsupermarkets
dc.titleConsumers’ perceptions and experiences of food quality in purchasing fresh food from retail outlets in Malaysia
dc.typeThesis
dcterms.educationLevelPh.D.
curtin.departmentSchool of Management, Curtin Business School
curtin.accessStatusOpen access


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