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dc.contributor.authorSefcik, Lesley
dc.contributor.authorZak, D.R.
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, D.S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T05:28:27Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T05:28:27Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationSefcik, L.T. and Zak, D.R. and Ellsworth, D.S. 2006. Photosynthetic responses to understory shade and elevated carbon dioxide concentration in four northern hardwood tree species. Tree Physiology: an international botanical journal. 26 (12): pp. 1589-1599.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/77908
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/treephys/26.12.1589
dc.description.abstract

Seedling responses to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) and solar irradiance were measured over two growing seasons in shade-tolerant Acer saccharum Marsh. and Fagus grandifolia J.F. Ehrh. and shade-intolerant Prunus serotina, a J.F. Ehrh. and Betula papyrifera Marsh. Seedlings were exposed to a factorial combination of [CO2] (ambient and elevated (658 micromol mol-1)) and understory shade (deep and moderate) in open-top chambers placed in a forest understory. The elevated [CO(2)] treatment increased mean light-saturated net photosynthetic rate by 63% in the shade-tolerant species and 67% in the shade-intolerant species. However, when measured at the elevated [CO(2)], long-term enhancement of photosynthesis was 10% lower than the instantaneous enhancement seen in ambient-[CO(2)]-grown plants (P < 0.021). Overall, growth light environment affected long-term photosynthetic enhancement by elevated [CO(2)]: as the growth irradiance increased, proportional enhancement due to elevated [CO(2)] decreased from 97% for plants grown in deep shade to 47% for plants grown in moderate shade. Results suggest that in N-limited northern temperate forests, trees grown in deep shade may display greater photosynthetic gains from a CO(2)-enriched atmosphere than trees growing in more moderate shade, because of greater downregulation in the latter environment. If photosynthetic gains by deep-shade-grown plants in response to elevated [CO(2)] translate into improved growth and survival of shade-intolerant species, it could alter the future composition and dynamics of successional forest communities.

dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESS
dc.subjectScience & Technology
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subjectForestry
dc.subjectAcer saccharum
dc.subjectBetula papyrifera
dc.subjectdeep shade
dc.subjectdownregulation
dc.subjectFagus grandifolia
dc.subjectnitrogen limitation
dc.subjectphotosynthetic enhancement
dc.subjectPrunus serotina
dc.subjectATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION
dc.subjectGROWN PINUS-RADIATA
dc.subjectLONG-TERM ELEVATION
dc.subjectLIGHT-AVAILABILITY
dc.subjectPOPULUS-TREMULOIDES
dc.subjectDEEP SHADE
dc.subjectSEEDLING RESPONSES
dc.subjectPARTIAL-PRESSURE
dc.subjectCANOPY POSITION
dc.subjectN AVAILABILITY
dc.titlePhotosynthetic responses to understory shade and elevated carbon dioxide concentration in four northern hardwood tree species.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.volume26
dcterms.source.number12
dcterms.source.startPage1589
dcterms.source.endPage1599
dcterms.source.issn1758-4469
dcterms.source.titleTree Physiology: an international botanical journal
dc.date.updated2020-02-13T05:28:27Z
curtin.departmentOffice of the Academic Registrar
curtin.accessStatusIn process
curtin.facultyOffice of the Academic Registrar
dcterms.source.eissn1758-4469


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