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dc.contributor.authorHussain, Ghulam
dc.contributor.authorGe, M.
dc.contributor.authorZhao, C.
dc.contributor.authorSilvester-Dean, Debbie
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-02T07:59:39Z
dc.date.available2020-07-02T07:59:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationHussain, G. and Ge, M. and Zhao, C. and Silvester, D.S. 2019. Fast responding hydrogen gas sensors using platinum nanoparticle modified microchannels and ionic liquids. Analytica Chimica Acta. 1072: pp. 35-45.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/79838
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aca.2019.04.042
dc.description.abstract

© 2019 Elsevier B.V.

From a safety perspective, it is vital to have fast responding gas sensors for toxic and explosive gases in the event of a gas leak. Amperometric gas sensors have been developed for such a purpose, but their response times are often relatively slow – on the order of 50 seconds or more. In this work, we have developed sensors for hydrogen gas that demonstrate ultra-fast response times. The sensor consists of an array of gold microchannel electrodes, electrodeposited with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs)to enable hydrogen electroactivity. Very thin layers (∼9 μm)of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs)result in an extremely fast response time of only 2 s, significantly faster than the other conventional electrodes examined (unmodified Pt electrode, and PtNP modified Au electrode). The RTIL layer in the microchannels is much thinner than the channel length, showing an interesting yet complex diffusion pattern and characteristic thin-layer behavior. At short times (e.g. on the timescale of cyclic voltammetry), the oxidation current is smaller and steady-state in nature, compared to macrodisk electrodes. At longer times (e.g. using long-term chronoamperometry), the diffusion layer is large for all surfaces and extends to the liquid/gas phase boundary, where the gas is continuously replenished from the flowing gas stream. Thus, the current response is the largest on the microchannel electrode, resulting in the highest sensitivity and lowest limit of detection for hydrogen. These microchannel electrodes appear to be highly promising surfaces for the ultrafast detection of hydrogen gas, particularly at relevant concentrations close to, or below, the lower explosive limit of 4 vol-% H2.

dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
dc.relation.sponsoredbyhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE120101456
dc.relation.sponsoredbyhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP150101861
dc.relation.sponsoredbyhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LE130100121
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & Technology
dc.subjectPhysical Sciences
dc.subjectChemistry, Analytical
dc.subjectChemistry
dc.subjectHydrogen sensing
dc.subjectGas detection
dc.subjectMicrochannels
dc.subjectRoom temperature ionic liquids
dc.subjectResponse time
dc.subjectOXYGEN REDUCTION
dc.subjectELECTROCHEMICAL OXIDATION
dc.subjectFUEL-CELL
dc.subjectELECTRODES
dc.subjectBIS(TRIFLUOROMETHYLSULFONYL)IMIDE
dc.subjectVOLTAMMETRY
dc.subjectSUPEROXIDE
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.subjectKINETICS
dc.subjectREDOX
dc.titleFast responding hydrogen gas sensors using platinum nanoparticle modified microchannels and ionic liquids
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.volume1072
dcterms.source.startPage35
dcterms.source.endPage45
dcterms.source.issn0003-2670
dcterms.source.titleAnalytica Chimica Acta
dc.date.updated2020-07-02T07:57:54Z
curtin.departmentSchool of Molecular and Life Sciences (MLS)
curtin.accessStatusOpen access
curtin.facultyFaculty of Science and Engineering
curtin.contributor.orcidSilvester-Dean, Debbie [0000-0002-7678-7482]
curtin.contributor.researcheridSilvester-Dean, Debbie [D-4679-2013]
dcterms.source.eissn1873-4324
curtin.contributor.scopusauthoridSilvester-Dean, Debbie [14623139100]


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