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dc.contributor.authorRiddell, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorLappe, M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-07T03:02:58Z
dc.date.available2020-09-07T03:02:58Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationRiddell, H. and Lappe, M. 2018. Heading Through a Crowd. Psychological Science. 29 (9): pp. 1504-1514.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/80928
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0956797618778498
dc.description.abstract

© The Author(s) 2018.

The ability to navigate through crowds of moving people accurately, efficiently, and without causing collisions is essential for our day-to-day lives. Vision provides key information about one’s own self-motion as well as the motions of other people in the crowd. These two types of information (optic flow and biological motion) have each been investigated extensively; however, surprisingly little research has been dedicated to investigating how they are processed when presented concurrently. Here, we showed that patterns of biological motion have a negative impact on visual-heading estimation when people within the crowd move their limbs but do not move through the scene. Conversely, limb motion facilitates heading estimation when walkers move independently through the scene. Interestingly, this facilitation occurs for crowds containing both regular and perturbed depictions of humans, suggesting that it is likely caused by low-level motion cues inherent in the biological motion of other people.

dc.languageeng
dc.subjectbiological motion
dc.subjectheading
dc.subjectnavigation
dc.subjectopen data
dc.subjectoptic flow
dc.subjectvision
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectCues
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMotion Perception
dc.subjectOptic Flow
dc.subjectPhotic Stimulation
dc.subjectWalking
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.titleHeading Through a Crowd
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.volume29
dcterms.source.number9
dcterms.source.startPage1504
dcterms.source.endPage1514
dcterms.source.issn0956-7976
dcterms.source.titlePsychological Science
dc.date.updated2020-09-07T03:02:57Z
curtin.departmentSchool of Psychology
curtin.accessStatusIn process
curtin.facultyFaculty of Health Sciences
curtin.contributor.orcidRiddell, Hugh [0000-0001-8218-7822]
dcterms.source.eissn1467-9280
curtin.contributor.scopusauthoridRiddell, Hugh [56741049600]


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