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dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Riley
dc.contributor.authorRamsay, Josh
dc.contributor.authorLee, Y.
dc.contributor.authorPang, S.
dc.contributor.authorO'Dea, M.
dc.contributor.authorPearson, J.
dc.contributor.authorAxon, J.
dc.contributor.authorRaby, E.
dc.contributor.authorAbdulgader, S.
dc.contributor.authorWhitelaw, A.
dc.contributor.authorCoombs, G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11T03:05:35Z
dc.date.available2019-09-11T03:05:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationMurphy, R.J. and Ramsay, J.P. and Lee, Y.T. and Pang, S. and O'Dea, M.A. and Pearson, J.C. and Axon, J.E. et al. 2019. Multiple introductions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST612 into Western Australia associated with both human and equine reservoirs. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11937/76269
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2019.08.022
dc.description.abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human and animal pathogen. Multilocus sequence type 612 (ST612) is the dominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clone in certain South African hospitals and is sporadically isolated from horses and horse-associated veterinarians in Australia. Colonization and infection by ST612-MRSA is increasing in Western Australia. Whole-genome sequencing was performed for 51 ST612-MRSA isolated from Western Australian patients and healthcare workers, South African hospital patients, Australian veterinarians and New South Wales horses. Core-genome phylogenies suggested Australian equine and veterinarian-associated ST612 were monophyletic. Individual Western Australian isolates grouped either with this equine-associated lineage or more diverse lineages related to those in South African hospitals. Bioinformatic analyses of the complete ST612-MRSA reference genome SVH7513 confirmed ST612-MRSA was closely related to ST8 USA500 MRSA. Common use of rifampicin in South Africa and equine veterinarian practice may favor ST612-MRSA in these settings. ST612-MRSA-colonized humans and horses are potential reservoirs for MRSA in Australia.

dc.languageeng
dc.subjectMRSA
dc.subjectMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
dc.subjectbacteremia
dc.subjectequine
dc.subjectmolecular epidemiology
dc.subjectzoonosis
dc.titleMultiple introductions of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST612 into Western Australia associated with both human and equine reservoirs.
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.source.issn0924-8579
dcterms.source.titleInternational Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
dc.date.updated2019-09-11T03:05:35Z
curtin.departmentSchool of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences
curtin.accessStatusFulltext not available
curtin.facultyFaculty of Health Sciences
dcterms.source.eissn1872-7913


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